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Shafi Goldwasser To Deliver The 15th Annual Paris C. Kanellakis Memorial Lecture On December 16

Shafi Goldwasser of MIT and the Weizmann Institute of Science will deliver the Fifteenth Annual Paris C. Kanellakis Memorial Lecture on Wednesday, December 16, 2015, at 4 PM in Room 368 of the Thomas J. Watson Sr. Center for Information Technology at Brown University's Department of Computer Science. A reception will follow.

This lecture series honors Paris Kanellakis, a distinguished computer scientist who was an esteemed and beloved member of the Brown Computer Science Department. Paris joined the Computer Science Department in 1981 and became a full professor in 1990. His research area was theoretical computer science, with emphasis on the principles of database systems, logic in computer science, the principles of distributed computing and combinatorial optimization. He died in an airplane crash on December 20,1995, along with his wife, Maria Teresa Otoya, and their two young children, Alexandra and Stephanos Kanellakis.

Shafi Goldwasser
MIT & Weizmann Institute of Science


The Cryptographic Lens

"Going beyond the basic challenge of private communication, in the last 35 years, cryptography has become the general study of correctness and privacy of computation in the presence of a computationally bounded adversary, and as such has changed how we think of proofs, reductions, randomness, secrets, and information.

In this talk I will discuss some beautiful developments in the theory of computing  through this Cryptographic Lens, as well as recent developments in cryptography that may allow the next successful shift from local to global computation."

Shafi Goldwasser is the RSA Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. She is also a professor of computer science and applied mathematics at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. Dr. Goldwasser received a BS degree in applied mathematics from Carnegie Mellon University in 1979, and MS and PhD degrees in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1984.

Dr. Goldwasser was the recipient of the Gödel Prize in 1993 and another in 2001 for her work on interactive proofs and connections to approximation. She was awarded the ACM Grace Murray Hopper award, the RSA award in mathematics, the ACM Athena award for women in computer science, the Benjamin Franklin Medal in Computer and Cognitive Science, the IEEE Emanuel R. Piore award, and the ACM Turing Award for 2012. She is a member of the AAAS, NAS and NAE.

Host: Professor Paul Valiant